Social StudiesAccording to the National Council for the Social Studies, the social studies cover the "integrated study of the social sciences and humanities to promote civic competence." Social studies is commonly recognized as a course or set of courses taught in the K-12 grade range, but may also refer to the study of post secondary aspects of human society. Social studies courses may be interdisciplinary and draw upon various fields, including sociology but also political science, history, economics, religious studies, geography, psychology, anthropology, and civics. At the elementary school level, social studies generally focuses first on the local community and family. By middle and high school, the social studies curriculum becomes more discipline-based and content-specific. OPEN NH courses in the social studies content areas deal with both social studies content and the supporting pedagogy necessary to teach them effectively.
National Council for the Social Studies
New Hampshire Council for the Social Studies


This course will enable teachers to move beyond history textbooks to use primary sources and web-based lessons to make history come alive for their students. Participants will explore exemplary websites, learn how to integrate primary sources into different parts of instruction, discover a wide array of online resources, and learn how to find and create WebQuests. Peer support and feedback will enable all participants to become comfortable with online resources and primary sources. By the end of the course, each participant will have a selection of primary sources, online resources, and lesson ideas to implement into their curricula.


This workshop is designed to familiarize participants with the resources available to them on the World Wide Web for the purpose of guiding their students on a "field trip" using Internet resources to provide as authentic an experience as possible without really going there. Throughout this six week workshop websites will be explored and analyzed for their usefulness. Participants will become familiar with tools available via the World Wide Web to support the journey. Consideration will be made to ensure alignment with the Massachusetts State Frameworks. Each participant will leave the online workshop with a detailed lesson plan suitable for the classroom.

Addressing the individual learning styles of students can be a challenge for teachers. The World Wide Web contains a vast number of resources to assist teachers in understanding and planning for the different avenues through which students learn best. Participants in this workshop will review a range of web sites providing information about learning theory related to learning styles and multiple intelligences, as well as resources to assist teachers in both identifying students' learning styles and intelligences and engaging students in activities which best suit those styles and intelligences. Participants will become familiar with teaching strategies and tools targeted for each learning style and intelligence and develop a preliminary lesson plan using those strategies and tools.

This course will enable teachers to move beyond history textbooks to use primary sources and web-based lessons to make history come alive for their students. Participants will explore exemplary websites, learn how to integrate primary sources into different parts of instruction, discover a wide array of online resources, and learn how to find and create WebQuests. Peer support and feedback will enable all participants to become comfortable with online resources and primary sources. By the end of the course, each participant will have a selection of primary sources, online resources, and lesson ideas to implement into their curricula.

This course will enable teachers to move beyond history textbooks to use primary sources and web-based lessons to make history come alive for their students. Participants will explore exemplary websites, learn how to integrate primary sources into different parts of instruction, discover a wide array of online resources, and learn how to find and create WebQuests. Peer support and feedback will enable all participants to become comfortable with online resources and primary sources. By the end of the course, each participant will have a selection of primary sources, online resources, and lesson ideas to implement into their curricula.

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