ScienceThe word science, derived from the Latin word for 'knowledge" is a systematic study that builds and organizes knowledge in the form of testable explanations and predictions about the universe. Science can also refer to the body of knowledge that can be rationally explained and reliably applied. The study of science not only refers to the knowledge itself, but also to a way of pursuing knowledge. Science is restricted to those branches of study that seek to explain the phenomena of the natural and human made universe. OPEN NH courses in the sciences deal with content, concept, process, as well as the supporting pedagogy necessary to teach them effectively.
National Science Teachers Association
New Hampshire Science Teachers Association

This course provides background Life Science information for K-6 teachers as well as any teacher wishing to learn about these new Life Science understandings. Participants will use a combination of video, readings, reflection and online discussion during the seven weeks of the course. Topics covered in this course include: What is Life?; Classification; Animal and Plant Life Cycles. There is a companion course: Understanding the Science of Life: Communities, Ecosystems, and Natural Selection which includes the topics of Natural Selection; Evolution; Energy Flow in Communities; and Material Cycles in Ecosystems.


This course is designed to provide you with an understanding of the nature of the matter and energy from which the universe is made. These concepts are basic to the development of science literacy in both teachers and students alike. Throughout this seven-week course, you will explore and discuss the meaning of the fundamental concepts necessary for literacy in science. The course will increase foundational knowledge and understanding of the nature of science, Newton’s laws of motion, energy, atoms and bonding, and quantum mechanics. Video from Annenberg Media (www.learner.org) will be used to enhance the content. You will be facilitated through an inquiry-based approach to learning as you explore web sites and online tutorials to uncover concepts. The course is appropriate for educators of all positions and grade levels. This course is the first in a series of three courses based on “Science Matters: Achieving Science Literacy” by Robert Hazen and James Trefil (Anchor, 1991).

In this workshop, participants will explore the use of online resources to enhance inquiry-based teaching and learning in science. Over the course of this six session workshop, participants will become familiar with science-themed websites, online collaborative projects, science blogs and wikis, and the mapping applications Google Maps and Google Earth. Considerable attention is paid to helping participants identify ways that they can integrate these tools into their practice, and thus enrich their students’ engagement with science content. Promoting scientific inquiry is a central theme, and serves as a lens for this course. Participants consider the issue of assessment, specifically as it relates to inquiry and the use of online tools, later in the course. As a final project, participants develop plans for an inquiry-based science lesson that uses an Internet-based data source.

This course provides background Life Science information for K-6 teachers as well as any teacher wishing to learn about these new Life Science understandings. Participants will use a combination of video, readings, reflection and online discussion during the seven weeks of the course. Topics covered in this course include: What is Life?; Classification; Animal and Plant Life Cycles. There is a companion course: Understanding the Science of Life: Communities, Ecosystems, and Natural Selection which includes the topics of Natural Selection; Evolution; Energy Flow in Communities; and Material Cycles in Ecosystems.

In this workshop, participants will explore the use of online resources to enhance inquiry-based teaching and learning in science. Over the course of this six session workshop, participants will become familiar with science-themed websites, online collaborative projects, science blogs and wikis, and the mapping applications Google Maps and Google Earth. Considerable attention is paid to helping participants identify ways that they can integrate these tools into their practice, and thus enrich their students’ engagement with science content. Promoting scientific inquiry is a central theme, and serves as a lens for this course. Participants consider the issue of assessment, specifically as it relates to inquiry and the use of online tools, later in the course. As a final project, participants develop plans for an inquiry-based science lesson that uses an Internet-based data source.

This course is designed to provide you with an understanding of the nature of the matter and energy from which the universe is made. These concepts are basic to the development of science literacy in both teachers and students alike. Throughout this seven-week course, you will explore and discuss the meaning of the fundamental concepts necessary for literacy in science. The course will increase foundational knowledge and understanding of the nature of science, Newton’s laws of motion, energy, atoms and bonding, and quantum mechanics. Video from Annenberg Media (www.learner.org) will be used to enhance the content. You will be facilitated through an inquiry-based approach to learning as you explore web sites and online tutorials to uncover concepts. The course is appropriate for educators of all positions and grade levels. This course is the first in a series of three courses based on “Science Matters: Achieving Science Literacy” by Robert Hazen and James Trefil (Anchor, 1991).

This course provides background Life Science information for K-6 teachers as well as any teacher wishing to learn about these new Life Science understandings. Participants will use a combination of video, readings, reflection and online discussion during the seven weeks of the course. Topics covered in this course include: What is Life?; Classification; Animal and Plant Life Cycles. There is a companion course: Understanding the Science of Life: Communities, Ecosystems, and Natural Selection which includes the topics of Natural Selection; Evolution; Energy Flow in Communities; and Material Cycles in Ecosystems.

The Next Generation Science Standards provide an important opportunity for educators not only to improve the science education of our students, but also the achievement of our students.  The standards represent conceptual shifts that move the vision of science education towards scientific practice and cross cutting concepts in order to deepen the understanding of the disciplinary core ideas that comprise the individual science domains.  In this course, you will explore the important concepts that are form the disciplinary core ideas of Earth and Space Science.  You will become familiar with these concepts and the performance expectations of the Next Generation Science Standards so that you can more effectively provide your students with opportunities to achieve competency in them.  As you explore the standards and the expectations for learning at each core idea, you will begin to think of assessments and activities that will engage your students and enhance their learning experiences.  As a final project, you will develop a lesson plan that you can use with your students that provides them with the experience and practice they need to be competent in a standard of your choice.

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